XRT
(SAO, NASA, JAXA, NAOJ)

Hinode (was Solar-B) was launched at 6:36 a.m. on September 23, 2006 (Japan Standard Time).


2015-June-30
New XPOW: A Long, Bright Flare

2015-June-23
New XPOW: Four Active Regions

2015-June-16
New XPOW: Swept Away

2015-June-08
New XPOW: Expanding Boundaries

2015-June-02
New XPOW: Looking Through the Atmosphere

2015-May-26
New XPOW: A Sympathetic Flare

2015-May-19
Big News! Hinode Scientist Patrick McCauley was awarded the Fulbright Scholarship. Patrick will begin a Ph.D. in solar physics at the University of Sydney next year. Congratulations from the Hinode/XRT Team Patrick! We will miss you but look forward to calling you Dr. McCauley.

New XPOW: A Little Squirt

2015-May-12
New XPOW: Three Years in the Life of XRT

2015-May-05
New XPOW: Prominence Eruption

2015-April-28
New XPOW: Bright Loops and Dark Loops

2015-April-21
New XPOW: The Transit of AR12320

2015-April-14
New XPOW: Small Flare in AR12320

2015-April-07
New XPOW: X2.1 Flare

2015-March-31
New XPOW: XRT Phone Wallpaper

2015-March-24
New XPOW: Solar Eclipse

2015-March-17
New XPOW: Flare Cusp in 8 Filters

2015-March-10
New XPOW: Vorticity Amid Flaring Loops

2015-March-03
New XPOW: Colorful Corona

See the XRT News page for older XRT news items.


The Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT) is a high-resolution grazing-incidence telescope, which is a successor to the highly successful Yohkoh Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT). A primary purpose of the Hinode XRT is to observe the generation, transport, and emergence of solar magnetic fields, as well as the ultimate dissipation of magnetic energy in forms such as flares and pico-flares, coronal heating, and coronal mass ejections. The XRT aboard Hinode observes the dissipation part of the life-cycle story of solar magnetic fields. High-resolution soft X-ray images reveal magnetic field configuration and its evolution, allowing us to observe the energy buildup, storage and release process in the corona for any transient event. One of the unique features of XRT is its wide temperature coverage to see all the coronal features that are not seen with any normal incidence telescope.

The XRT consists of the X-ray and visible light optics, focal plane mechanisms (filters and shutter), and the 2k x 2k CCD camera. The Mission Data Processor (MDP) also plays a vital role for XRT.

The XRT was designed and developed by the Japan-US collaboration between Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), NASA MSFC, JAXA, and NAOJ. The XRT telescope was tested and calibrated at the XRCF at MSFC, and the CCD camera was tested and calibrated in X-rays at the ATC of the NAOJ with JAXA.

If XRT data is used in a published article or report, please give a proper Acknowledgement:

"Hinode is a Japanese mission developed and launched by ISAS/JAXA, with NAOJ as domestic partner and NASA and STFC (UK) as international partners. It is operated by these agencies in co-operation with ESA and the NSC (Norway)."

If an XRT image is displayed in a popular article, on a website, et cetera, then please acknowledge the contributing institutions:

"(SAO, NASA, JAXA, NAOJ)"

You may find a list of the XRT instrument papers and other important references that should be considered for inclusion in your XRT science paper HERE.

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